Rotary Club of Cedar Park

Cedar Park, Texas

 

Club Executives & Directors

President
Treasurer
Secretary
Past President
Membership
Public Relations
Service Projects
Club Administration
President Elect
The Rotary Foundation
 

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Welcome to The Rotary Club of Cedar Park Website!

Welcome to our Club!

Cedar Park

Service Above Self

We meet Tuesdays at 7:00 AM
Cedar Park Regional Medical Center
1401 Medical Parkway
Classrooms 1 & 2
Cedar Park, TX  78613
United States
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District Site
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Venue Map
 

News & Announcements

Visiting The Austin Spurs

This week Tim Pryor spoke to us about the Austin Spurs.  Tim wears many hats within the Spurs organization, including sales and marketing.
The Austin Spurs were established in Columbus, Georgia as The Columbus Riverdragons.
 
The franchise in 2005 was sold to Southwest Basketball, LLC, and were relocated to the city of Austin, Texas. Following the relocation, the franchise changed their name and logo becoming the Austin Toros, which was unveiled on August 10, 2005. The Toros name was the only NBA-associated team and first D-League team to possess a nickname of Spanish origin. The Toros began play during the 2005-2006 season.
 
The team now plays their home games at Cedar Park Center. They have been very successful, making the postseason 7 out of their 12 seasons in the NBA Development League.
 
On June 28, 2007, the Toros were acquired by the San Antonio Spurs, becoming the second D-League team ever to be owned by an NBA team, after the Los Angeles D-Fenders were purchased by the Los Angeles Lakers in 2006.
 
On August 9, 2010, the Toros announced they would move to the Cedar Park Center from the Austin Convention Center and would play in their new facility starting in the 2010–11 season.
 
On April 28, 2012, the Toros defeated the Los Angeles D-Fenders in Game 3 of the NBA D-League Finals to capture their first championship in franchise history.
On October 15, 2014, the team announced that they will be changing their name to the Austin Spurs, in reference to their parent team.  After the San Antonio Spurs purchased the franchise, the team colors and logo were changed to reflect the silver and black motif used by the Spurs.
 
To learn more, or to order tickets, visit http://austin.dleague.nba.com/
 
 

 
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Rotary's Areas of Focus

For more than 100 years, Rotarians have joined together from all continents, cultures, and industries to take action in our communities and around the world.  With a commitment to achieving lasting change, Rotarians work together to empower youth, enhance health, promote peace, and most importantly, advance the community.  While Rotarians can serve in countless ways, Rotary has focused it efforts in six areas, which reflect some of the most critical and widespread humanitarian needs:

  • Peace and conflict prevention/resolution
  • Disease prevention and treatment
  • Water and sanitation
  • Maternal and child health
  • Basic education and literacy
  • Economic and community development
To learn more about Rotary and its work in these six area, browse this website and/or visit the Rotary International website.
 

 
 

Why Rotary?


Members of a Rotary Club are frequently asked "What is Rotary and why should I join?"  Here is a video answer to these questions.

 
 

 
 
 
 

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Nigeria sees no wild polio cases for one year
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Australian students take opportunity by the horns
The rules of the Shaftesbury Rodeo Academy are simple: no school, no rodeo. It’s a message that teenagers who attend school at Bisley Farm, most of whom have never attended any school regularly, take seriously. Because come Friday night, these aspiring rodeo heroes want to join their friends to ride bulls for a heart-stopping eight seconds, if they last that long. The school in rural Queensland, Australia, also teaches the boys, who are of the Wakka Wakka Aboriginal people, basic academics and farming skills, including how to care for crops and livestock. It’s a fairly common form of...
Illiteracy traps adults, and their families, in poverty
Around the world, millions of adults are unable to read or write, and therefore struggle to earn a living for themselves and their families. Even in the United States, with its considerable resources, there are 36 million adults who can’t read better than the average third-grader, according to the international nonprofit ProLiteracy. In Detroit, Michigan, a widely cited 2003 survey conducted by the National Institute for Literacy found that almost half of residents over age 16 were functionally illiterate -- unable to use reading, speaking, writing, and computer skills in everyday life....